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2dcc:

take me to a museum. kiss me on the steps. shove the Mona Lisa up my ass

(via thesassiestblogger)

Source: 2dcc
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After this long day, at least I can say Happy Birthday to my blog. Here’s to a new year. Allons-y!

Source: assets
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sixpenceee:

Anatoli Bugorski might be the luckiest scientist of all time.

While poking around the machine, Bugorski stuck his head inside the accelerator and straight into the path of a proton beam.

As it coursed through his skull, the proton beam burned a hole through Bugorski’s brain. While it was painless, he said he was blinded by a flash “brighter than a thousand suns.”

After staggering away from the machine, the left side of his face swelled to enormous proportions. Later, the skin near the entry and exit wounds peeled away, and Bugorski lost hearing in his left ear. However, this Soviet survived his mind-blowing experience, perhaps because the proton beam was moving at nearly the speed of light.

Despite his good luck, Bugorski eventually lost every nerve in the left side of his face becoming partially paralyzed. The proton beam also damaged Bugorski’s mental capabilities, though not as badly as you might expect. Despite his handicap, Bugorski earned a PhD and is still alive today, proving that it takes a lot more than a proton beam to kill a Russian.

SOURCE

FOR A POST ON THE MAN WITH ALMOST NO BRAIN

Source: sixpenceee
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Well April 15.
Much rollercoster

Such odd
No good feeling

Wow

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nprbooks:

Twenty-five years ago, on April 15, 1989, Chinese students were mourning the death of a reformist leader. But what began as mourning evolved into mass protests demanding democracy. Demonstrators remained in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, day after day, until their protests were brutally suppressed by the Chinese army — on June 4. Hundreds died; to this day, no one knows how many.

NPR’s Louisa Lim explores those events, the forgotten deaths and the Chinese government’s rewriting of the official narrative in a new book, The People’s Republic of Amnesia. Her story includes an investigation into a forgotten crackdown in the southwestern city of Chengdu — which, to this day, has never been reported.

Tang Deying holds her determination in the stubborn set of her jaw. This diminutive, disheveled, elderly woman shuffling into the room in her pink plastic flip-flops is one of the few living links to the crackdown in Chengdu during the summer of 1989.

When martial law troops opened fire on civilians in Beijing on June 4, 1989, the violence was beamed immediately into living rooms around the world. Yet it has taken a quarter-century for details to emerge of the deadly events in Chengdu that cost Tang’s 17-year-old son his life.

For 25 years, a single aim has driven Tang’s existence: seeking restitution and accountability for the death of her son, Zhou Guocong, who was fatally beaten in police custody after disappearing in the 1989 Chengdu crackdown.

"Right is right. Wrong is wrong," she told me firmly

See the rest of the story here.

Images courtesy Louisa Lim and Kim Nygaard

(via npr)

Source: nprbooks
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plainstreetpro:

indigo-rae:

plainstreetpro:

plainstreetpro:

WHY IS THERE SNOW OUTSIDE!?
HOW IS THERE NOW SNOW ON THE GROUND!?
IT’S THE MIDDLE OF APRIL FOR HEAVEN’S SAKE!
THE FUCK, MICHIGAN!?
IT IS NO LONGER WINTER!
FROZEN IS OVER.

AND NOW IT ALL MELTED IN THE COURSE OF A DAY. SERIOUSLY, MICHIGAN? GET YOUR SHIT TOGETHER.

I know, right? Yesterday was 76 degrees, and today there’s snow! What the hell?!

The snowpocalypse is never-ending.

Ok so I’m sorry guys, my tea date with Elsa went well so I guess she might be staying around for awhile. You guys cool with that?

Source: plainstreetpro
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"I know pain. You think you can handle it, and then one day you can’t."

- Dr. Gregory House (via stilltiedtothetracks)

(via fantastic-crafts)

Source: stilltiedtothetracks
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lordoftheinternet:

some thoughts are so private that you only share them with a therapist or 17,000 people on the internet

(via pandalovingmaknae)

Source: lordoftheinternet
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